TALK TO US! 800-531-9977, info@mcelroytranslation.com
|  Login

Top 5 reasons our clients love McElroy’s customer portal!

27. June 2011 12:23 by Susan Andrus, marketing manager in   //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)

McElroy’s BusinessManager provides access for requesting quotes, placing orders, uploading source files, downloading completed projects, viewing status reports, and invoicing. The BusinessManager that our clients log into is the same BusinessManager used in-house to develop quotes, manage orders, assign work to translators and vendors, and track projects. This ensures real-time status updating and ultimate efficiency in project management, thus increasing project expediency without sacrificing McElroy quality.

 

So what are the top 5 benefits and reasons why clients love our portal?

 

1. Account history: All translation projects have been processed through BusinessManager since January 1, 2011; data on quotes, orders, and invoices are easily retrievable via secure login. Both source and translated files for projects completed since January 1 are available for download at the client’s convenience. Access to this information allows our clients to reference past project turn times and costs when planning for future projects, as well as providing backup to all past translation project files.

 

2. File retrieval: Files are easily uploaded via a browse option when requesting a quote or placing an order. Files are also easily located along with each record they correspond with for downloading via the portal upon completion of the project. The BusinessManager folder structure is set up by language/locale combination for clarity on multilingual projects.

 

3. Status reports: The progress of a quote, order, or invoice has never been clearer! Clients know when a project manager has received their request and if it is being processed. It is immediately apparent whether a quote is new, in preparation, pending, expired, revised, rejected, accepted, changed to order, or canceled. Order statuses include new, in preparation, in progress, deliverable, delivered, approved, invoiced, paid, or canceled. Additionally, each order references a quote number, and each invoice references both the quote and order number, so clients can easily review each stage of their project.

 

And it gets better! For each project the multiple steps or tasks involved are identified as jobs. Whatever services that are going to be performed on a project will have a job name associated with it. For example, a standard project may include four jobs: translation, setting up the file, editing/proofing, and shipping. Clients are able to see a project’s status at each individual job level as it progresses through our workflow.

 

4. Proactive communication: When a request for a quote is submitted, clients are notified that the request has been received and when to expect the quote. When an order is placed, a confirmation is sent to the client with the expected delivery time. Special requests per project can be made by clients when submitting the quote or order, and all requests specific to all projects are saved on the account level, allowing our clients to make sure that we have all special instructions. All project statuses are available, as well as project history dating back to January 1, 2011. By proactively ensuring that our clients have all of this data at their fingertips, we save them the time usually required to request basic information.

 

5. Individual and Group login, access hierarchy: Each contact who orders with McElroy will receive a private login, providing access to information regarding projects that have been submitted by that individual. If there are multiple people within a department submitting projects, there is an additional level that allows managers to view all projects within that department. This makes it possible for them to easily monitor translation volume within the department, as well as fill in for any staff members that may be out, should a quote need to be approved or a project delivered.

GERMANY: History, Government, and Culture

27. June 2011 12:14 by Administrator in   //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)

Historical Overview:

 

Germanic and Celtic tribes, hailing originally from Russia, were living in the region now known as Germany by 1000 BC. These tribes were continually at war with the Romans. In AD 400, a group called the Franks defeated the Romans.

 

In AD 800, the Frankish ruler Charlemagne made a move to revive the Roman Empire. He consolidated vast lands including northern Italy and the majority of France under his rule. After his time, however, Germany was divided into many states that then elected an emperor.

 

Medieval Germany was ruled by a succession of hereditary dynasties. The first was the Saxons in 963, under the Holy Roman Emperor Otto the Great.

 

From the eleventh to the thirteenth centuries, German history was dominated by conflicts between the popes and emperors regarding the Investiture Controversy, wherein the authority of monarchies to appoint church officials was challenged.

 

In 1517, Martin Luther, a German monk, instigated the Reformation movement. He called for changes and demanded reforms from the Roman Catholic Church. The religious strife he gave impetus to led to a division of Germany into Roman Catholic (southern) and Protestant (northern) states that didn’t end until 1648.

 

In the nineteenth century, Germany and other areas of Europe came under Napoleon Bonaparte’s rule after he defeated the Holy Roman Empire. After Napoleon himself was defeated, the Congress of Vienna convened in 1814 and founded a Germany Confederation composed of 35 autonomous states. In 1871, Otto von Bismarck, the chancellor of Prussia, instigated the reunification of Germany under Prussian leadership.

 

During the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, German leaders fostered industrialization and tried to expand their influence in Europe and in other countries. This helped trigger World War I in 1914. The German Empire was defeated and subsequently replaced by the Weimar Republic in 1918. The harsh outcome of the war left the country in crisis, both economic and political.

 

When Adolf Hitler came to power in 1933, he set out to correct the crisis by remilitarizing Germany along with the infamous campaign to create a master race. When German forces invaded Poland in 1939, a second world war was set in motion.

 

In 1945, Germany was again defeated in World War II. It was divided by the victors into zones of influence that became what we commonly refer to as East Germany (German Democratic Republic) and West Germany (Federal Republic of Germany). Berlin, the capital, was also divided in the process.

 

East Germany adopted communism and was closely linked with the Soviet Union. On the other hand, West Germany adopted a parliamentary democracy and built strong ties with Western Europe and the United States. Within a mere two decades of the defeat in World War II, West Germany had become one of the world’s richest countries with a prosperity that trickled down to the entire population. East Germany, on the other hand, had fallen far behind economically. Dissatisfaction with the communist system led millions of East Germans to flee to West Germany from 1946 to 1961. Because of this, East Germany built the Berlin Wall to block the major escape path.

 

In the eighties a chain of events including massive political protests and emigration to West Germany set the stage for German reunification. In November 1989, the government of East Germany abolished travel restrictions. In addition, non-Communist political parties were allowed to organize. In March 1990, parliamentary elections were held in East Germany that paved the way for non-Communists to gain control of the government.

 

With the end of Communist rule in East Germany, both sides started to consider reunification. In July 1990, the economies of the two nations were merged into a single system. A month after, East Germany and West Germany signed a treaty finalizing unification. This treaty took effect on October 3, 1990. Berlin was named the capital of Germany once again.

 

 Germany’s Government:

 

Unified Germany is a federal parliamentary republic governed by the constitution of 1949.

 

The federal president is considered the head of state but has little influence on the government. He or she is elected for a term of five years by the Bundesversammlung (federal convention) that meets for this sole purpose. This convention is made up of the Bundestag (Federal Diet) and the same number of delegates from the state parliaments.

 

The chancellor is considered the head of the government. He or she is elected for a four-year term by a majority of the Bundestag.

 

There is a Parliament that is composed of two houses. The Bundesrat (Federal Council or upper house) has 69 seats. Each state is represented by three to six members, depending on its population. The Bundestag (lower house) is made up of 614 deputies with a term of four years elected via a mixed system of direct voting and proportional representation.

 

Germany has 16 states, each of which has its own legislature, constitution, and government. The government of each state is allowed to enact laws on all matters except finance, foreign affairs, and defense. These three areas are the sole province of the federal government.

 

 German Culture:

 

Greetings: Even though German culture is evolving due to the more relaxed recent generations, greetings are still fairly formal. The traditional greeting is a quick and firm handshake. Upon entering a room, Germans usually shake hands with everyone, including children. If there are unfamiliar faces in the group, they usually wait for the host to introduce them to everybody. When it comes to introductions, Germans place a huge importance on titles. The title and the last name are initially used unless the person is invited to use the first name.

 

Communication: When it comes to business dealings, Germans don’t require a personal relationship. What they will be interested in are the number of years that your company has been in operation and your academic credentials. Also, they show great respect for people in authority, so it is important that they know your level vis-à-vis their own.

 

German communication is relatively formal. It is crucial that you adhere to the accepted protocol to build and maintain business relationships. In meetings, do not be too expressive as Germans are suspicious of exaggerated talk and promises that seem too good to be true. It is better to go straight to the point as they are accustomed to doing. Giving compliments is also not included in German business protocol and may cause awkwardness and embarrassment. In business transactions, expect a lot of written communication that will serve as a record of discussions and decisions that were made.

 

Saying No: Germans usually don’t have a problem with turning down an invitation or a request. They will most likely say no, not because they’re insensitive or because they mean to be discourteous, but because it’s simply a statement of fact. You may or may not feel uncomfortable, but be ready to apologize for errors and provide explanations or solutions.

 

On the other hand, Germans are very sensitive to criticism. They have an individualistic culture, so they are more concerned with their public “face.” As such, avoid doing anything that will embarrass them in public.

 

Eye Contact: Maintain direct eye contact during conversations and especially during introductions while you’re being addressed by the person. Even in public, eye contact can be direct and not smiling all the time. However, don’t assume that stares are meant to be threatening. Do not expect that direct eye contact will necessitate a greeting from Germans. They also won’t expect anything from you.

 

Gift Giving: If you are invited to come to a German’s house, bringing a gift such as flowers or chocolates is deemed respectful. Tea or yellow roses are always welcome. On the other hand, red roses are seen as an expression of romantic intentions. Do not offer carnations since these represent mourning. Also, do not offer lilies and chrysanthemums because they’re used in funerals. Should you decide to bring wine, bring one that is imported such as French or Italian. Bringing German wines is seen as indicating that you believe that your host won’t serve a good-quality wine. Once received, gifts are usually opened right away.

 

When meeting with a person for the first time, opt for a small gift. Large gifts are unusual and should definitely not be given before a deal has been made so that your intentions won’t be misconstrued. Substantial gifts shouldn’t be given in private. The general rule is that the bigger the gift, the more public and official the giving should be.

 

Dining: If you’ve been invited for dinner, do not arrive too early. Arrive on time instead as punctuality is an indication of good planning. Also, never arrive more than 15 minutes after the set time without contacting the host beforehand to explain why. If attending a business dinner, remember not to use first names when talking to people. Business is still business even when eating. Send the host a handwritten thank-you note the following day to express your gratitude.

 

Sources

 

http://www2.csusm.edu/mgannon/.../CULTURAL%20METAPHORS.dochttp://asag-biotech.net/Data/Countries/Germany/.../Germany_Cultural_Tips.pdf

http://www.bbc.co.uk/languages/german/lj/cultural_notes/greetings.shtml 

https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/gm.html

http://www.mapsofworld.com/germany/population.html

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/231186/Germany

http://www.executiveplanet.com/index.php?title=Germany:_Gift_Giving

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Germany

http://www.nationsonline.org/oneworld/History/Germany-history.htm

http://www.plu.edu/~emmersle/doc/expatriates-guide.doc

http://www.spainexchange.com/guide/DE-history.htm

http://gotraveltogermany.com/germany-history.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ageing_of_Europe#Germany

http://www.indexmundi.com/germany/life_expectancy_at_birth.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/languages/european_languages/countries/germany.shtml

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_of_Germany

http://www.mapsofworld.com/germany/germany-country-and-germany-states/germany-government/

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/country_profiles/1047864.stm

 

 

 

 

 

GERMANY: History, Government, and Culture

27. June 2011 10:33 by Administrator in   //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)

Historical Overview:

 

Germanic and Celtic tribes, hailing originally from Russia, were living in the region now known as Germany by 1000 BC. These tribes were continually at war with the Romans. In AD 400, a group called the Franks defeated the Romans.

 

In AD 800, the Frankish ruler Charlemagne made a move to revive the Roman Empire. He consolidated vast lands including northern Italy and the majority of France under his rule. After his time, however, Germany was divided into many states that then elected an emperor.

 

Medieval Germany was ruled by a succession of hereditary dynasties. The first was the Saxons in 963, under the Holy Roman Emperor Otto the Great.

 

From the eleventh to the thirteenth centuries, German history was dominated by conflicts between the popes and emperors regarding the Investiture Controversy, wherein the authority of monarchies to appoint church officials was challenged.

 

In 1517, Martin Luther, a German monk, instigated the Reformation movement. He called for changes and demanded reforms from the Roman Catholic Church. The religious strife he gave impetus to led to a division of Germany into Roman Catholic (southern) and Protestant (northern) states that didn’t end until 1648.

 

In the nineteenth century, Germany and other areas of Europe came under Napoleon Bonaparte’s rule after he defeated the Holy Roman Empire. After Napoleon himself was defeat, the Congress of Vienna convened in 1814 and founded a Germany Confederation composed of 35 autonomous states. In 1871, Otto von Bismarck, the chancellor of Prussia, instigated the reunification of Germany under Prussian leadership.

 

During the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, German leaders fostered industrialization and tried to expand their influence in Europe and in other countries. This helped trigger World War I in 1914. The German Empire was defeated and subsequently replaced by the Weimar Republic in 1918. The harsh outcome of the war left the country in crisis, both economic and political.

 

When Adolf Hitler came to power in 1933, he set out to correct the crisis by remilitarizing Germany along with the infamous campaign to create a master race. When German forces invaded Poland in 1939, a second world war was set in motion.

 

In 1945, Germany was again defeated in World War II. It was divided by the victors into zones of influence that became what we commonly refer to as East Germany (German Democratic Republic) and West Germany (Federal Republic of Germany). Berlin, the capital, was also divided in the process.

 

East Germany adopted communism and was closely linked with the Soviet Union. On the other hand, West Germany adopted a parliamentary democracy and built strong ties with Western Europe and the United States. Within a mere two decades of the defeat in World War II, West Germany had become one of the world’s richest countries with a prosperity that trickled down to the entire population. East Germany, on the other hand, had fallen far behind economically. Dissatisfaction with the communist system led millions of East Germans to flee to West Germany from 1946 to 1961. Because of this, East Germany built the Berlin Wall to block the major escape path.

 

In the eighties a chain of events including massive political protests and emigration to West Germany set the stage for German reunification. In November 1989, the government of East Germany abolished travel restrictions. In addition, non-Communist political parties were allowed to organize. In March 1990, parliamentary elections were held in East Germany that paved the way for non-Communists to gain control of the government.

 

With the end of Communist rule in East Germany, both sides started to consider reunification. In July 1990, the economies of the two nations were merged into a single system. A month after, East Germany and West Germany signed a treaty finalizing unification. This treaty took effect on October 3, 1990. Berlin was named the capital of Germany once again.

 

Germany’s Government:

 

Unified Germany is a federal parliamentary republic governed by the constitution of 1949.

 

The federal president is considered the head of state but has little influence on the government. He or she is elected for a term of five years by the Bundesversammlung (federal convention) that meets for this sole purpose. This convention is made up of the Bundestag (Federal Diet) and the same number of delegates from the state parliaments.

 

The chancellor is considered the head of the government. He or she is elected for a four-year term by a majority of the Bundestag.

 

There is a Parliament that is composed of two houses. The Bundesrat (Federal Council or upper house) has 69 seats. Each state is represented by three to six members, depending on its population. The Bundestag (lower house) is made up of 614 deputies with a term of four years elected via a mixed system of direct voting and proportional representation.

 

Germany has 16 states, each of which has its own legislature, constitution, and government. The government of each state is allowed to enact laws on all matters except finance, foreign affairs, and defense. These three areas are the sole province of the federal government.

 

 

German Culture:

 

Greetings: Even though German culture is evolving due to the more relaxed recent generations, greetings are still fairly formal. The traditional greeting is a quick and firm handshake. Upon entering a room, Germans usually shake hands with everyone, including children. If there are unfamiliar faces in the group, they usually wait for the host to introduce them to everybody. When it comes to introductions, Germans place a huge importance on titles. The title and the last name are initially used unless the person is invited to use the first name.

 

Communication: When it comes to business dealings, Germans don’t require a personal relationship. What they will be interested in are the number of years that your company has been in operation and your academic credentials. Also, they show great respect for people in authority, so it is important that they know your level vis-à-vis their own.

 

German communication is relatively formal. It is crucial that you adhere to the accepted protocol to build and maintain business relationships. In meetings, do not be too expressive as Germans are suspicious of exaggerated talk and promises that seem too good to be true. It is better to go straight to the point as they are accustomed to doing. Giving compliments is also not included in German business protocol and may cause awkwardness and embarrassment. In business transactions, expect a lot of written communication that will serve as a record of discussions and decisions that were made.

 

Saying No: Germans usually don’t have a problem with turning down an invitation or a request. They will most likely say no, not because they’re insensitive or because they mean to be discourteous, but because it’s simply a statement of fact. You may or may not feel uncomfortable, but be ready to apologize for errors and provide explanations or solutions.

 

On the other hand, Germans are very sensitive to criticism. They have an individualistic culture, so they are more concerned with their public “face.” As such, avoid doing anything that will embarrass them in public.

 

Eye Contact: Maintain direct eye contact during conversations and especially during introductions while you’re being addressed by the person. Even in public, eye contact can be direct and not smiling all the time. However, don’t assume that stares are meant to be threatening. Do not expect that direct eye contact will necessitate a greeting from Germans. They also won’t expect anything from you.

 

Gift Giving: If you are invited to come to a German’s house, bringing a gift such as flowers or chocolates is deemed respectful. Tea or yellow roses are always welcome. On the other hand, red roses are seen as an expression of romantic intentions. Do not offer carnations since these represent mourning. Also, do not offer lilies and chrysanthemums because they’re used in funerals. Should you decide to bring wine, bring one that is imported such as French or Italian. Bringing German wines is seen as indicating that you believe that your host won’t serve a good-quality wine. Once received, gifts are usually opened right away.

 

When meeting with a person for the first time, opt for a small gift. Large gifts are unusual and should definitely not be given before a deal has been made so that your intentions won’t be misconstrued. Substantial gifts shouldn’t be given in private. The general rule is that the bigger the gift, the more public and official the giving should be.

 

Dining: If you’ve been invited for dinner, do not arrive too early. Arrive on time instead as punctuality is an indication of good planning. Also, never arrive more than 15 minutes after the set time without contacting the host beforehand to explain why. If attending a business dinner, remember not to use first names when talking to people. Business is still business even when eating. Send the host a handwritten thank-you note the following day to express your gratitude.

 

 

Sources

 

http://www2.csusm.edu/mgannon/.../CULTURAL%20METAPHORS.doc

http://asag-biotech.net/Data/Countries/Germany/.../Germany_Cultural_Tips.pdf

http://www.bbc.co.uk/languages/german/lj/cultural_notes/greetings.shtml

https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/gm.html

http://www.mapsofworld.com/germany/population.html

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/231186/Germany

http://www.executiveplanet.com/index.php?title=Germany:_Gift_Giving

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Germany

http://www.nationsonline.org/oneworld/History/Germany-history.htm

http://www.plu.edu/~emmersle/doc/expatriates-guide.doc

http://www.spainexchange.com/guide/DE-history.htm

http://gotraveltogermany.com/germany-history.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ageing_of_Europe#Germany

http://www.indexmundi.com/germany/life_expectancy_at_birth.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/languages/european_languages/countries/germany.shtml

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_of_Germany

http://www.mapsofworld.com/germany/germany-country-and-germany-states/germany-government/

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/country_profiles/1047864.stm

McElroy Translation

McElroy Translation has 41 years of industry success helping clients meet global language needs by providing medical, legal, technical, and business translation, as well as software and website localization.

Month List

Copyright © 1999-2014, McElroy Translation. All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Contact Us | Learn More